Ishtar the Great Mother of the Anunnaki

Ishtar the Mother of the Anunnaki. A look into the true nature of the Great Mother Ishtar. She appears to have a parasite of sorts… Ishtar was undoubtedly a goddess of the fertility of the earth. She was the ‘Great Mother’ who fostered all vegetation and agriculture. She is frequently addressed as ‘Mother of the gods,’ the Anunnaki, and the name “Ishtar ” became a generic designation for “goddess.” But of course these were later honors. When her cult centred at Erech, it appears to have speedily blossomed out in many directions, and, as has been said, lesser cults probably eagerly identified themselves with that of the Great Earth-Mother, so that in time her worship became more than a Babylonian cult. Astrologically she was identified with the Planet Venus , but so numerous were the attributes surrounding her taken from other goddesses with which she had become identified that they threatened to overshadow her real character, which was that of the great and fertile mother. More especially did her identification with Nin-lil, the consort of Enlil, the storm-god, threaten to alter her real nature, as in this guise she was regarded as a goddess of W-battle. It is rare that a goddess of fertility or love achieves such a distinction. In some texts we find that, so far from being able to protect herself, Ishtar and her property are made the prey of the savage Anunnaki Enlil, the storm-god. Enlil “His word sent me forth,” she complains; watch the video… The poem, which in its existing form consists of 137 lines in cuneiform characters, appears to be incomplete. We are not told therein the purpose of the goddess in journeying to the ‘House of No-return,’ but we gather from various legends and from the concluding portion of the poem itself that she went there in search of her bridegroom Tammuz, the sun-god of Eridu. Ishtar is certainly one of the most important characters of this region.

Narrated and Created by A.Christie

Shamash/Utu: the Great Lord of the Shining House

Shamash, the Great Lord of Light. Shamash god of the sun was one of the most popular deities of the Babylonian and Assyrian pantheon. First mentioned in the reign of E-Anna-Tum, or about 4200 b.c. Shamash is called the son of Sin, the moon-god, which perhaps has reference to the fact that the solar calendar succeeded the lunar in Babylonia the same can be found in practically all civilisations of advancement. The inscriptions give due prominence to his status as a great lord of light, and in them he is called the ‘illuminator of the regions,’ ‘lord of living creatures,’ ‘gracious one of the lands,’ and so forth. He is supposed to throw open the gates of the morning and raise his head over the horizon, lighting up the heaven and earth with his beams. The knowledge of justice and injustice and the virtue of righteousness was attributed to him, and he was regarded as a judge between good and evil, for as the light of the sun penetrates everywhere, and nothing can be hidden from its beams, it is not strange that it should stand as the symbol for justice. Shamash appears at the head of the inscription which bears the laws of Hammurabi, and here he stands as the symbol for justice. The towns at which he was principally worshiped were Sippar and Larsa, where his sanctuary was known as E-Babbara, or the ‘shining house.’ Larsa was probably the older of the two centers, but from the times of Sargon, Sippar became the more important, and in the days of Hammurabi ranked immediately after Babylon. According to Sumerian mythology, Shamash helped protect Dumuzid when the galla demons tried to drag him to the Underworld and he appeared to the hero Ziusudra after the Great Flood. In the Epic of Gilgamesh, Shamash helps Gilgamesh defeat the ogre Humbaba. Utu, later worshiped in ancient Mesopotamia by East Semitic peoples as Shamash around 3,000 BC. Created and Narrated by A.Christie (Ancient Mystery)

The Secret Source of Babylonian Cosmology

The Secret Source of Babylonian Cosmology. The origin of the Babylonian and Akkadian cosmology did not differ in this respect from other races in the same stage of development. In whatever direction we look when examining the cosmologies of barbarian or semi-civilized peoples, we find a total inability to get behind and beyond the idea that the matter of creation lay already to the hand of the creative agency, and that in order to shape a world it had but to draw the material therefore from the teeming deep or the slain body of a hostile monster. The cosmology of Babylon is therefore on a par with those of Scandinavia, China, and many North American Indian tribes, nor does it reach so high an imaginative level as those of ancient Egypt, India, or the Maya of Central America, in some of which, the vocal command of a god is sufficient to bring about the creation of the earth and the waters surrounding it. The making of the sun, the moon, and the other heavenly bodies is, as will be more fully shown later, of great importance in Babylonian myth. The stars appear to have been attached to the firmament of heaven as to a cloth. Across this the sun passed daily, his function being to inspect the movements of the other heavenly bodies. The moon, likewise, had her fixed course, and certain stars were also supposed to move across the picture of the night with greater or less regularity. The Secret heavens were guarded at either end by a great gateway, and through one of these the sun passed after rising from the ocean, whilst in setting he quit the heavens by the opposite portal. The terrestrial world was imagined as a great hollow structure resting on the ( deep.’ Indeed, it would seem to have been regarded as an island floating on an abyss of waters. This conception of the world of earth was by no means peculiar to the Babylonians, but was shared by them with many of the nations of antiquity. As emanating from the blood of Merodach/Marduk himself, man was looked upon as directly of heavenly origin. An older tradition existed to the effect that the Anunnaki Merodach/Marduk had been assisted in the creation of mankind by the goddess Aruru, who figures in the Gilgamesh epic as the creator of Eabani out of a piece of clay. We also find an ancient belief that humanity owed its origin to the god Ea/Enki, but when Merodach displaced this god politically, he would, of course, ‘ take over ’ his entire record and creative deeds as well as his powers and sovereign-ties. At Nippur Bel was looked up to as the originator of man. But these beliefs probably obtained in remoter times, and would finally be quenched by the advance to full and unquestioned power of the great god Merodach/Marduk. Some mythologists see in the story of Jonah a hidden allusion to the circumstances of Babylonian cosmology…there appears to be a “Secret Source” behind IT all; Narrated, Created by A.Christie