Ishtar the Great Mother of the Anunnaki

Ishtar the Mother of the Anunnaki. A look into the true nature of the Great Mother Ishtar. She appears to have a parasite of sorts… Ishtar was undoubtedly a goddess of the fertility of the earth. She was the ‘Great Mother’ who fostered all vegetation and agriculture. She is frequently addressed as ‘Mother of the gods,’ the Anunnaki, and the name “Ishtar ” became a generic designation for “goddess.” But of course these were later honors. When her cult centred at Erech, it appears to have speedily blossomed out in many directions, and, as has been said, lesser cults probably eagerly identified themselves with that of the Great Earth-Mother, so that in time her worship became more than a Babylonian cult. Astrologically she was identified with the Planet Venus , but so numerous were the attributes surrounding her taken from other goddesses with which she had become identified that they threatened to overshadow her real character, which was that of the great and fertile mother. More especially did her identification with Nin-lil, the consort of Enlil, the storm-god, threaten to alter her real nature, as in this guise she was regarded as a goddess of W-battle. It is rare that a goddess of fertility or love achieves such a distinction. In some texts we find that, so far from being able to protect herself, Ishtar and her property are made the prey of the savage Anunnaki Enlil, the storm-god. Enlil “His word sent me forth,” she complains; watch the video… The poem, which in its existing form consists of 137 lines in cuneiform characters, appears to be incomplete. We are not told therein the purpose of the goddess in journeying to the ‘House of No-return,’ but we gather from various legends and from the concluding portion of the poem itself that she went there in search of her bridegroom Tammuz, the sun-god of Eridu. Ishtar is certainly one of the most important characters of this region.

Narrated and Created by A.Christie

Lord and Master of The Anunnaki

The Anunnaki Lord and Master Bel, the earlier name is Enlil, found in very early inscriptions, especially in those of Nippur; of which city he was the tutelary deity. He was described as the ‘ lord of the lower world,’ and much effort seems to have been made, to reach a definite conception of his position and attributes. His name had also been translated ‘lord of mist.’ The title ‘Bel’ had been given to Merodach by Tiglath-pileser I about 1200 B.C., after which he was referred to as ‘the older Bel.’ The chief seat of his worship was at Nippur, where the name of his temple, E-Kur or ‘mountain-house,’ which was applied to sanctuaries all over Babylonia. He was also addressed as the ‘lord of the storm’ and as the ‘great mountain,’ and his consort. Nin-lil is also alluded to as ‘lady of the mountain.’ Enlil is undoubtedly of the class of tempest-deities who dwell on mountain peaks. The second tablet of a text known as the ‘crying storm’ alludes to En-lil as a storm-god. Addressing him it says : “Spirit that overcomes no evildoing, spirit that has no mother, spirit that has no wife, spirit that has no sister, spirit that has no brother, that knows no abiding place, the evil-slaying spirit that devastates the fold, that wrecks the stall, that sweeps away son and mother like a reed. When En-lil, the lord of lands, cries out at sunset the dreadful word goes forth unto the spacious shrine, ‘Destroy.’” Nippur, the city of Enlil, was of Sumerian origin, so we must connect the earliest cult of Enlil with the Sumerian aborigines. Many of his lesser names point to such a conclusion. Some authorities appear to be of opinion that because En-lil was regarded as a god of vegetation the change was owing to his removal from a mountainous.The truth is, it would be difficult to discover a god who wielded the powers of the wind and rain who was not a patron of agriculture, but as he sends beneficent rains, so also may he destroy and devastate. The word lil which occurs in the name Enlil, signifies a ‘demon,’ and Enlil may therefore mean the Anunnaki ‘chief-demon.’ This shows the very early, animistic nature of the god. In the trinity which consisted of Bel, Ea, and Anu, he is regarded as the ‘god of the earth,’ that is, the earth is his sphere, and he is at times addressed as ‘Bel, the lord of the lands.’ Created, Narrated and additional information by A.Christie Information: Professor A.H.Sayce/folklorist and occult scholar Lewis Spence & A.Christie

The Secret Source of Babylonian Cosmology

The Secret Source of Babylonian Cosmology. The origin of the Babylonian and Akkadian cosmology did not differ in this respect from other races in the same stage of development. In whatever direction we look when examining the cosmologies of barbarian or semi-civilized peoples, we find a total inability to get behind and beyond the idea that the matter of creation lay already to the hand of the creative agency, and that in order to shape a world it had but to draw the material therefore from the teeming deep or the slain body of a hostile monster. The cosmology of Babylon is therefore on a par with those of Scandinavia, China, and many North American Indian tribes, nor does it reach so high an imaginative level as those of ancient Egypt, India, or the Maya of Central America, in some of which, the vocal command of a god is sufficient to bring about the creation of the earth and the waters surrounding it. The making of the sun, the moon, and the other heavenly bodies is, as will be more fully shown later, of great importance in Babylonian myth. The stars appear to have been attached to the firmament of heaven as to a cloth. Across this the sun passed daily, his function being to inspect the movements of the other heavenly bodies. The moon, likewise, had her fixed course, and certain stars were also supposed to move across the picture of the night with greater or less regularity. The Secret heavens were guarded at either end by a great gateway, and through one of these the sun passed after rising from the ocean, whilst in setting he quit the heavens by the opposite portal. The terrestrial world was imagined as a great hollow structure resting on the ( deep.’ Indeed, it would seem to have been regarded as an island floating on an abyss of waters. This conception of the world of earth was by no means peculiar to the Babylonians, but was shared by them with many of the nations of antiquity. As emanating from the blood of Merodach/Marduk himself, man was looked upon as directly of heavenly origin. An older tradition existed to the effect that the Anunnaki Merodach/Marduk had been assisted in the creation of mankind by the goddess Aruru, who figures in the Gilgamesh epic as the creator of Eabani out of a piece of clay. We also find an ancient belief that humanity owed its origin to the god Ea/Enki, but when Merodach displaced this god politically, he would, of course, ‘ take over ’ his entire record and creative deeds as well as his powers and sovereign-ties. At Nippur Bel was looked up to as the originator of man. But these beliefs probably obtained in remoter times, and would finally be quenched by the advance to full and unquestioned power of the great god Merodach/Marduk. Some mythologists see in the story of Jonah a hidden allusion to the circumstances of Babylonian cosmology…there appears to be a “Secret Source” behind IT all; Narrated, Created by A.Christie