Anunnaki Demon Anzu

The mysterious Anzu Bird, the winged fallen Demon of ancient Mesopotamian belief. A very dark character, veiled with love and light. An entity of many names and many faces. Who or what is IT? The most mysterious Anunnaki I have came across is certainly the demonic Anzu. The elements of this figure can be found almost everywhere…yet nowhere. The Anzu Tablet predates the Seven Tablets of Creation which has been overlooked by many in their quest for the truth. A big mistake. Anzu or Zu is a lesser divinity or monster found within in several Mesopotamian religions. He was said to be conceived by the pure waters of the Apsu and the Earth, or as son of the goddess Siris. (Patron of Beer). Anzû was depicted as a massive black bird who can breathe fire and water, known as the “divine storm bird” and is the “flood storm weapon” of the Anunnaki gods although Anzû is alternately depicted as a lion-headed eagle. He is also known as the Rockh the darkness, the black bird and the Thunder bird. According to Thorkild Jacobsen, the demon god was originally envisioned as a huge black thundercloud in the shape of an eagle, and was only later depicted with a lion’s head to connect it to the roar of thunder. This demon consisting of half man and half bird, stole the “Tablet of Destinies” from Enlil and hid them on a mountaintop. In Babylonian myth, Anzû is an Anunnaki deity associated with cosmogony. Anzu also appears in the story of “Inanna  and the Huluppu Tree”, which is recorded in the preamble to the Sumerian epic poem Gilgamesh, Enkidu, and the Netherworld. Anzu also appears in the ancient Sumerian poem Return of Lugalbanda or Lugalbanda and the Anzud Bird…although, Zu/Anzu also goes by the name Lugalbanda…”food for thought”. The shorter Old Babylonian version was found at Susa. Full version in Myths from Mesopotamia: Creation, The Flood, Gilgamesh, and Others by Stephanie Dalley, page 222 and at The Epic of Anzû, Old Babylonian version from Susa, Tablet II, lines 1-83, read by Claus Wilcke. The longer Late Assyrian version from Nineveh is most commonly called The Myth of Anzu. (Full version in Dalley, page 205). The rest is already known to you… Narrated and Created by A.Christie (m7) creator

Shamash/Utu: the Great Lord of the Shining House

Shamash, the Great Lord of Light. Shamash god of the sun was one of the most popular deities of the Babylonian and Assyrian pantheon. First mentioned in the reign of E-Anna-Tum, or about 4200 b.c. Shamash is called the son of Sin, the moon-god, which perhaps has reference to the fact that the solar calendar succeeded the lunar in Babylonia the same can be found in practically all civilisations of advancement. The inscriptions give due prominence to his status as a great lord of light, and in them he is called the ‘illuminator of the regions,’ ‘lord of living creatures,’ ‘gracious one of the lands,’ and so forth. He is supposed to throw open the gates of the morning and raise his head over the horizon, lighting up the heaven and earth with his beams. The knowledge of justice and injustice and the virtue of righteousness was attributed to him, and he was regarded as a judge between good and evil, for as the light of the sun penetrates everywhere, and nothing can be hidden from its beams, it is not strange that it should stand as the symbol for justice. Shamash appears at the head of the inscription which bears the laws of Hammurabi, and here he stands as the symbol for justice. The towns at which he was principally worshiped were Sippar and Larsa, where his sanctuary was known as E-Babbara, or the ‘shining house.’ Larsa was probably the older of the two centers, but from the times of Sargon, Sippar became the more important, and in the days of Hammurabi ranked immediately after Babylon. According to Sumerian mythology, Shamash helped protect Dumuzid when the galla demons tried to drag him to the Underworld and he appeared to the hero Ziusudra after the Great Flood. In the Epic of Gilgamesh, Shamash helps Gilgamesh defeat the ogre Humbaba. Utu, later worshiped in ancient Mesopotamia by East Semitic peoples as Shamash around 3,000 BC. Created and Narrated by A.Christie (Ancient Mystery)