The Mysterious Lotus Eaters and the Wind Demon

Lotus Eaters and the Wind Demon. Found within Greek mythology are the lotus-eaters who were a race of people living on an island dominated by the Lotus tree. There are mythical elements contained in story, namely the mysterious wind demon. The lotus fruits and flowers in the ancient mythical story were the primary food of the island and were a narcotic, causing the inhabitants to sleep in peaceful apathy. Figuratively, ‘lotus-eater’ denotes “a person who spends their time indulging in pleasure and luxury rather than dealing with practical concerns”. That also sounds familiar doesn’t it. In the Odyssey Book IX, immediately references the wind, a reference to the wind demon. Odysseus tells how adverse north winds blew him and his men off course as they were rounding Cape Malea, the southernmost tip of the Peloponnesus, headed westwards for Ithaca:

Anunnaki Demon Anzu

The mysterious Anzu Bird, the winged fallen Demon of ancient Mesopotamian belief. A very dark character, veiled with love and light. An entity of many names and many faces. Who or what is IT? The most mysterious Anunnaki I have came across is certainly the demonic Anzu. The elements of this figure can be found almost everywhere…yet nowhere. The Anzu Tablet predates the Seven Tablets of Creation which has been overlooked by many in their quest for the truth. A big mistake. Anzu or Zu is a lesser divinity or monster found within in several Mesopotamian religions. He was said to be conceived by the pure waters of the Apsu and the Earth, or as son of the goddess Siris. (Patron of Beer). Anzû was depicted as a massive black bird who can breathe fire and water, known as the “divine storm bird” and is the “flood storm weapon” of the Anunnaki gods although Anzû is alternately depicted as a lion-headed eagle. He is also known as the Rockh the darkness, the black bird and the Thunder bird. According to Thorkild Jacobsen, the demon god was originally envisioned as a huge black thundercloud in the shape of an eagle, and was only later depicted with a lion’s head to connect it to the roar of thunder. This demon consisting of half man and half bird, stole the “Tablet of Destinies” from Enlil and hid them on a mountaintop. In Babylonian myth, Anzû is an Anunnaki deity associated with cosmogony. Anzu also appears in the story of “Inanna  and the Huluppu Tree”, which is recorded in the preamble to the Sumerian epic poem Gilgamesh, Enkidu, and the Netherworld. Anzu also appears in the ancient Sumerian poem Return of Lugalbanda or Lugalbanda and the Anzud Bird…although, Zu/Anzu also goes by the name Lugalbanda…”food for thought”. The shorter Old Babylonian version was found at Susa. Full version in Myths from Mesopotamia: Creation, The Flood, Gilgamesh, and Others by Stephanie Dalley, page 222 and at The Epic of Anzû, Old Babylonian version from Susa, Tablet II, lines 1-83, read by Claus Wilcke. The longer Late Assyrian version from Nineveh is most commonly called The Myth of Anzu. (Full version in Dalley, page 205). The rest is already known to you… Narrated and Created by A.Christie (m7) creator

Ishtar the Great Mother of the Anunnaki

Ishtar the Mother of the Anunnaki. A look into the true nature of the Great Mother Ishtar. She appears to have a parasite of sorts… Ishtar was undoubtedly a goddess of the fertility of the earth. She was the ‘Great Mother’ who fostered all vegetation and agriculture. She is frequently addressed as ‘Mother of the gods,’ the Anunnaki, and the name “Ishtar ” became a generic designation for “goddess.” But of course these were later honors. When her cult centred at Erech, it appears to have speedily blossomed out in many directions, and, as has been said, lesser cults probably eagerly identified themselves with that of the Great Earth-Mother, so that in time her worship became more than a Babylonian cult. Astrologically she was identified with the Planet Venus , but so numerous were the attributes surrounding her taken from other goddesses with which she had become identified that they threatened to overshadow her real character, which was that of the great and fertile mother. More especially did her identification with Nin-lil, the consort of Enlil, the storm-god, threaten to alter her real nature, as in this guise she was regarded as a goddess of W-battle. It is rare that a goddess of fertility or love achieves such a distinction. In some texts we find that, so far from being able to protect herself, Ishtar and her property are made the prey of the savage Anunnaki Enlil, the storm-god. Enlil “His word sent me forth,” she complains; watch the video… The poem, which in its existing form consists of 137 lines in cuneiform characters, appears to be incomplete. We are not told therein the purpose of the goddess in journeying to the ‘House of No-return,’ but we gather from various legends and from the concluding portion of the poem itself that she went there in search of her bridegroom Tammuz, the sun-god of Eridu. Ishtar is certainly one of the most important characters of this region.

Narrated and Created by A.Christie