Anunnaki Demon Anzu

The mysterious Anzu Bird, the winged fallen Demon of ancient Mesopotamian belief. A very dark character, veiled with love and light. An entity of many names and many faces. Who or what is IT? The most mysterious Anunnaki I have came across is certainly the demonic Anzu. The elements of this figure can be found almost everywhere…yet nowhere. The Anzu Tablet predates the Seven Tablets of Creation which has been overlooked by many in their quest for the truth. A big mistake. Anzu or Zu is a lesser divinity or monster found within in several Mesopotamian religions. He was said to be conceived by the pure waters of the Apsu and the Earth, or as son of the goddess Siris. (Patron of Beer). Anzû was depicted as a massive black bird who can breathe fire and water, known as the “divine storm bird” and is the “flood storm weapon” of the Anunnaki gods although Anzû is alternately depicted as a lion-headed eagle. He is also known as the Rockh the darkness, the black bird and the Thunder bird. According to Thorkild Jacobsen, the demon god was originally envisioned as a huge black thundercloud in the shape of an eagle, and was only later depicted with a lion’s head to connect it to the roar of thunder. This demon consisting of half man and half bird, stole the “Tablet of Destinies” from Enlil and hid them on a mountaintop. In Babylonian myth, Anzû is an Anunnaki deity associated with cosmogony. Anzu also appears in the story of “Inanna  and the Huluppu Tree”, which is recorded in the preamble to the Sumerian epic poem Gilgamesh, Enkidu, and the Netherworld. Anzu also appears in the ancient Sumerian poem Return of Lugalbanda or Lugalbanda and the Anzud Bird…although, Zu/Anzu also goes by the name Lugalbanda…”food for thought”. The shorter Old Babylonian version was found at Susa. Full version in Myths from Mesopotamia: Creation, The Flood, Gilgamesh, and Others by Stephanie Dalley, page 222 and at The Epic of Anzû, Old Babylonian version from Susa, Tablet II, lines 1-83, read by Claus Wilcke. The longer Late Assyrian version from Nineveh is most commonly called The Myth of Anzu. (Full version in Dalley, page 205). The rest is already known to you… Narrated and Created by A.Christie (m7) creator

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