Apollo god – Anatolian – Greek mythology

A non-Greek origin of Apollo has long been assumed in scholarship. The name of Apollo’s mother Leto has Lydian origin, and she was worshipped on the coasts of Asia Minor. The inspiration oracular cult was probably introduced into Greece from Anatolia which is the origin of Sibyl, and where existed some of the oldest oracular shrines. Omens, symbols, purifications, and exorcisms appear in old Assyro-Babylonian texts, and these rituals were spread into the empire of the Hittites. In a Hittite text is mentioned that the king invited a Babylonian priestess for a certain “purification” A similar story is mentioned by Plutarch. He writes that the Cretan seer Epimenides purified Athens after the pollution brought by the Alcmeonidae and that the seer’s expertise in sacrifices and reform of funeral practices were of great help to Solon in his reform of the Athenian state. The story indicates that Epimenides was probably heir to the shamanic religions of Asia, and proves, together with the Homeric hymn that Crete had a resisting religion up to historical times. It seems that these rituals were dormant in Greece, and they were reinforced when the Greeks migrated to Anatolia. Homer pictures Apollo on the side of the Trojans, fighting against the Achaeans,during the Trojan War. He is pictured as a terrible god, less trusted by the Greeks than other gods. The god seems to be related to Appaliunas, a tutelary god of Wilusa (Troy) in Asia Minor, but the word is not complete. The stones found in front of the gates of Homeric Troy were the symbols of Apollo. The Greeks gave to him the name “agyieus” as the protector god of public places and houses who wards off evil, and his symbol was a tapered stone or column. However, while usually Greek festivals were celebrated at the full moon, all the feasts of Apollo were celebrated at the seventh day of the month and the emphasis is given to that day (sibutu) indicates a Babylonian origin.

Apollo (Attic, Ionic, and Homeric Greek: Ἀπόλλων, Apollōn (GEN Ἀπόλλωνος); Doric: Ἀπέλλων, Apellōn; Arcadocypriot: Ἀπείλων, Apeilōn; Aeolic: Ἄπλουν, Aploun; Latin: Apollō) is one of the most important and complex of the Olympian deities in classical Greek and Roman religion and Greek and Roman mythology. The ideal of the kouros (a beardless, athletic youth), Apollo has been variously recognized as a god of music, truth and prophecy, healing, the sun and light, plague, poetry, and more. Apollo is the son of Zeus and Leto, and has a twin sister, the chaste huntress Artemis. Apollo is known in Greek-influenced Etruscan mythology as Apulu.

As the patron of Delphi (Pythian Apollo), Apollo was an oracular god—the prophetic deity of the Delphic Oracle. Medicine and healing are associated with Apollo, whether through the god himself or mediated through his son Asclepius, yet Apollo was also seen as a god who could bring ill-health and deadly plague. Amongst the god’s custodial charges, Apollo became associated with dominion over colonists, and as the patron defender of herds and flocks. As the leader of the Muses (Apollon Musegetes) and director of their choir, Apollo functioned as the patron god of music and poetry. Hermes created the lyre for him, and the instrument became a common attribute of Apollo. Hymns sung to Apollo were called paeans, watch video for mythology on Apollo at ancient mystery on youtube.

Photo Credits:

400px-Map_of_Lydia_ancient_times-en.svg-cca by sa 3.0-by-Nekto-
800px-Chryse-Klaus-Peter Simon-cca by sa 3.o-GNU free 1.2-
AnatolieLimits-cca by sa 3.0-by-Spiridon Ion Cepleanu-
Archon_apollinus_MHNT_CUT_2013_3_7_female_dos_Turquie-cca by sa 4.0-by-Didier Descouens-
Bull’s_head,_shrine,_Çatalhöyük,_6000-5500_BC,_MACA,_99001-cca by sa 4.0-by-Zde-
Fly-Angel_crop-cca by sa 2.5-by-David Wilson Clarke-


Music Credit:

“Heavy Heart” Kevin MacLeod (
Licensed under Creative Commons: By Attribution 3.0 License

ancient mystery – youtube

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