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The Great Laviathan


Leviathan is a sea monster referenced in the Hebrew Bible in the Book of Job, Psalms, and Isaiah. The Leviathan of the Book of Job is a reflection of the older Canaanite Lotan, a primeval monster defeated by the god Hadad. Parallels to the role of Mesopotamian Tiamat defeated by Marduk, have long been drawn in comparative mythology, as have been wider comparisons to the dragon, and world serpent narratives such as Indra slaying Vrtra or Thor slaying Jörmungandr, but Leviathan already figures in the Hebrew Bible as a metaphor for a powerful enemy, notably Babylon (Isaiah 27:1), and some scholars have pragmatically interpreted it as referring to large aquatic creatures, such as the crocodile. The word later came to be used as a term for “great whale” as well as of sea monsters in general. The root name meaning is “to twine; to join”, with an adjectival suffix with a literal meaning of “wreathed, twisted in folds”. Both the name and the mythological figure are a direct continuation of the Ugaritic sea monster Lôtān, one of the servants of the sea god Yammu defeated by Hadad in the Baal Cycle watch video for more ancient mystery.

 

Music Credit:

“This House” Kevin MacLeod (incompetech.com)
Licensed under Creative Commons: By Attribution 3.0 License
http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/3.0/

Ancient Mystery/youtube

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Categories: Ancient history, Lower case g gods, Nephilim And Giants Are RealTags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,

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