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The Sumerian god: Ningishzida


Ningishzidda, is a Mesopotamian deity of vegetation and the underworld. Thorkild Jacobsen translates Ningishzida as Sumerian for “lord of the good tree”. Ningishzidda from Sumerian (“Lord of the Artifact of Life”) “Lord of the Artifact” meaning (pyramids) he appears in Adapa’s myth as one of the two guardians of Anu’s celestial palace, alongside Dumuzi. He was sometimes depicted as a serpent with a human head. Lagash had a temple dedicated to Ningishzida, and Gudea, patesi of Lagash in the 21st century BC, was one of his devotees. In the Louvre, there is a famous green steatite vase carved for King Gudea of Lagash, dedicated by its inscription: “To the god Ningiszida, his god Gudea, Ensi (governor) of Lagash, for the prolongation of his life, has dedicated this”. Ningishzidda is sometimes the son of Ninazu and Ningiridda, even though the myth Ningishzidda’s journey to the netherworld suggests he is the son of Ereshkigal. Following an inscription found at Lagash, he was the son of Anu, the heavens watch video for more ancient mystery.

Music Credit:

 

“Fantastic Dim Bar” Kevin MacLeod (incompetech.com)
Licensed under Creative Commons: By Attribution 3.0 License
http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/3.0/

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Categories: Ancient history, Anunnaki, Lower case g gods, Nephilim And Giants Are RealTags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,

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