Enki the Anunnaki god of the Abyss

Ea/Enki the Anunnaki god of the Abyss, was the third of the great Babylonian triad of gods, which consisted of Anu, En-lil, and himself. This documentary looks at the bigger picture concerning the mysterious Anunnaki gods of ancient Mesopotamia. Ea/Enki was a god of the waters, and like Anu is called the ‘ father of the Anunnaki gods.’ As a god of the Abyss he appears to have been also a deity of wisdom and occult power, thus allegorically associated with the idea of depth or profundity. He was the father of Merodach/Marduk, who consulted him on the most important matters connected with his kingship of the gods. Lord Ea/Enki was consulted by individuals of all classes who desired his light to be thrown upon their crafts or businesses. He was the god of artisans in general—blacksmiths, stone-cutters, sailors, and artificers of every kind. He was also the patron of prophets and seers. As the abyss is the place where the seeds of everything were supposed to originate, so he appears to have fostered reproduction of every description. Ea/Enki was supposed to dwell beside Anu, who inhabited the pole of the ecliptic. The site of his chief temple was at Eridu, which at one time stood, before the waters receded, upon the shore of the Persian Gulf. We have seen already that Ea/Enki, under his Greek name of Oannes, was supposed to bring knowledge and culture to the people of Eridu. There are many confusing myths connected with him, and he seems in some measure to enter into the Babylonian myth of the deluge. The chief extract from the fragments of Berossus concerning Oannes states that: “In the first year there made its appearance from a part of the Eruthrean sea, which bordered upon Babylonia, an animal endowed with reason, who was called Oannes.” According to the accounts of Apollodorus the whole body of the animal was like that of a fish and had under a fish’s head another head, and also feet below, similar to those of a man, joined to the fish’s tail. His speech, too, was articulate and human and there was a representation of him to be seen in the time of Berossus. After this there appeared other creatures like Oannes/Enki, of which Berossus promises to give an account when he comes to the history of the kings. He is thus very different from the god En-lil, the ‘ lord of heaven ’ who possesses so many attributes of destruction. Ea/Enki in his benevolent way thwarts the purpose of the riotous god of tempest, which greatly enrages En-lil, the two religious centres of Eridu and Nippur, were the cities of Ea and En-lil respectively. He was also called En-ki, which describes him as ‘ lord of the earth ’ through which his waters zig zagged. the wave-form-serpent-fish god.In such a country as Babylonia earth and water are closely associated, as under that soil water is always to be found at a distance of a few feet: thus the interior of the earth is the domain of Ea. Information Credit: Professor A.H.Sayce Occult expert Lewis Spence and “the Druid Christ” A.Christie (Ancient Mystery Documentaries) Narrated and Created by A.Christie

Shamash/Utu: the Great Lord of the Shining House

Shamash, the Great Lord of Light. Shamash god of the sun was one of the most popular deities of the Babylonian and Assyrian pantheon. First mentioned in the reign of E-Anna-Tum, or about 4200 b.c. Shamash is called the son of Sin, the moon-god, which perhaps has reference to the fact that the solar calendar succeeded the lunar in Babylonia the same can be found in practically all civilisations of advancement. The inscriptions give due prominence to his status as a great lord of light, and in them he is called the ‘illuminator of the regions,’ ‘lord of living creatures,’ ‘gracious one of the lands,’ and so forth. He is supposed to throw open the gates of the morning and raise his head over the horizon, lighting up the heaven and earth with his beams. The knowledge of justice and injustice and the virtue of righteousness was attributed to him, and he was regarded as a judge between good and evil, for as the light of the sun penetrates everywhere, and nothing can be hidden from its beams, it is not strange that it should stand as the symbol for justice. Shamash appears at the head of the inscription which bears the laws of Hammurabi, and here he stands as the symbol for justice. The towns at which he was principally worshiped were Sippar and Larsa, where his sanctuary was known as E-Babbara, or the ‘shining house.’ Larsa was probably the older of the two centers, but from the times of Sargon, Sippar became the more important, and in the days of Hammurabi ranked immediately after Babylon. According to Sumerian mythology, Shamash helped protect Dumuzid when the galla demons tried to drag him to the Underworld and he appeared to the hero Ziusudra after the Great Flood. In the Epic of Gilgamesh, Shamash helps Gilgamesh defeat the ogre Humbaba. Utu, later worshiped in ancient Mesopotamia by East Semitic peoples as Shamash around 3,000 BC. Created and Narrated by A.Christie (Ancient Mystery)

Lord and Master of The Anunnaki

The Anunnaki Lord and Master Bel, the earlier name is Enlil, found in very early inscriptions, especially in those of Nippur; of which city he was the tutelary deity. He was described as the ‘ lord of the lower world,’ and much effort seems to have been made, to reach a definite conception of his position and attributes. His name had also been translated ‘lord of mist.’ The title ‘Bel’ had been given to Merodach by Tiglath-pileser I about 1200 B.C., after which he was referred to as ‘the older Bel.’ The chief seat of his worship was at Nippur, where the name of his temple, E-Kur or ‘mountain-house,’ which was applied to sanctuaries all over Babylonia. He was also addressed as the ‘lord of the storm’ and as the ‘great mountain,’ and his consort. Nin-lil is also alluded to as ‘lady of the mountain.’ Enlil is undoubtedly of the class of tempest-deities who dwell on mountain peaks. The second tablet of a text known as the ‘crying storm’ alludes to En-lil as a storm-god. Addressing him it says : “Spirit that overcomes no evildoing, spirit that has no mother, spirit that has no wife, spirit that has no sister, spirit that has no brother, that knows no abiding place, the evil-slaying spirit that devastates the fold, that wrecks the stall, that sweeps away son and mother like a reed. When En-lil, the lord of lands, cries out at sunset the dreadful word goes forth unto the spacious shrine, ‘Destroy.’” Nippur, the city of Enlil, was of Sumerian origin, so we must connect the earliest cult of Enlil with the Sumerian aborigines. Many of his lesser names point to such a conclusion. Some authorities appear to be of opinion that because En-lil was regarded as a god of vegetation the change was owing to his removal from a mountainous.The truth is, it would be difficult to discover a god who wielded the powers of the wind and rain who was not a patron of agriculture, but as he sends beneficent rains, so also may he destroy and devastate. The word lil which occurs in the name Enlil, signifies a ‘demon,’ and Enlil may therefore mean the Anunnaki ‘chief-demon.’ This shows the very early, animistic nature of the god. In the trinity which consisted of Bel, Ea, and Anu, he is regarded as the ‘god of the earth,’ that is, the earth is his sphere, and he is at times addressed as ‘Bel, the lord of the lands.’ Created, Narrated and additional information by A.Christie Information: Professor A.H.Sayce/folklorist and occult scholar Lewis Spence & A.Christie

The Secret Source of Babylonian Cosmology

The Secret Source of Babylonian Cosmology. The origin of the Babylonian and Akkadian cosmology did not differ in this respect from other races in the same stage of development. In whatever direction we look when examining the cosmologies of barbarian or semi-civilized peoples, we find a total inability to get behind and beyond the idea that the matter of creation lay already to the hand of the creative agency, and that in order to shape a world it had but to draw the material therefore from the teeming deep or the slain body of a hostile monster. The cosmology of Babylon is therefore on a par with those of Scandinavia, China, and many North American Indian tribes, nor does it reach so high an imaginative level as those of ancient Egypt, India, or the Maya of Central America, in some of which, the vocal command of a god is sufficient to bring about the creation of the earth and the waters surrounding it. The making of the sun, the moon, and the other heavenly bodies is, as will be more fully shown later, of great importance in Babylonian myth. The stars appear to have been attached to the firmament of heaven as to a cloth. Across this the sun passed daily, his function being to inspect the movements of the other heavenly bodies. The moon, likewise, had her fixed course, and certain stars were also supposed to move across the picture of the night with greater or less regularity. The Secret heavens were guarded at either end by a great gateway, and through one of these the sun passed after rising from the ocean, whilst in setting he quit the heavens by the opposite portal. The terrestrial world was imagined as a great hollow structure resting on the ( deep.’ Indeed, it would seem to have been regarded as an island floating on an abyss of waters. This conception of the world of earth was by no means peculiar to the Babylonians, but was shared by them with many of the nations of antiquity. As emanating from the blood of Merodach/Marduk himself, man was looked upon as directly of heavenly origin. An older tradition existed to the effect that the Anunnaki Merodach/Marduk had been assisted in the creation of mankind by the goddess Aruru, who figures in the Gilgamesh epic as the creator of Eabani out of a piece of clay. We also find an ancient belief that humanity owed its origin to the god Ea/Enki, but when Merodach displaced this god politically, he would, of course, ‘ take over ’ his entire record and creative deeds as well as his powers and sovereign-ties. At Nippur Bel was looked up to as the originator of man. But these beliefs probably obtained in remoter times, and would finally be quenched by the advance to full and unquestioned power of the great god Merodach/Marduk. Some mythologists see in the story of Jonah a hidden allusion to the circumstances of Babylonian cosmology…there appears to be a “Secret Source” behind IT all; Narrated, Created by A.Christie

The Mysterious Lotus Eaters and the Wind Demon

Lotus Eaters and the Wind Demon. Found within Greek mythology are the lotus-eaters who were a race of people living on an island dominated by the Lotus tree. There are mythical elements contained in story, namely the mysterious wind demon. The lotus fruits and flowers in the ancient mythical story were the primary food of the island and were a narcotic, causing the inhabitants to sleep in peaceful apathy. Figuratively, ‘lotus-eater’ denotes “a person who spends their time indulging in pleasure and luxury rather than dealing with practical concerns”. That also sounds familiar doesn’t it. In the Odyssey Book IX, immediately references the wind, a reference to the wind demon. Odysseus tells how adverse north winds blew him and his men off course as they were rounding Cape Malea, the southernmost tip of the Peloponnesus, headed westwards for Ithaca:

Anunnaki Demon Anzu

The mysterious Anzu Bird, the winged fallen Demon of ancient Mesopotamian belief. A very dark character, veiled with love and light. An entity of many names and many faces. Who or what is IT? The most mysterious Anunnaki I have came across is certainly the demonic Anzu. The elements of this figure can be found almost everywhere…yet nowhere. The Anzu Tablet predates the Seven Tablets of Creation which has been overlooked by many in their quest for the truth. A big mistake. Anzu or Zu is a lesser divinity or monster found within in several Mesopotamian religions. He was said to be conceived by the pure waters of the Apsu and the Earth, or as son of the goddess Siris. (Patron of Beer). Anzû was depicted as a massive black bird who can breathe fire and water, known as the “divine storm bird” and is the “flood storm weapon” of the Anunnaki gods although Anzû is alternately depicted as a lion-headed eagle. He is also known as the Rockh the darkness, the black bird and the Thunder bird. According to Thorkild Jacobsen, the demon god was originally envisioned as a huge black thundercloud in the shape of an eagle, and was only later depicted with a lion’s head to connect it to the roar of thunder. This demon consisting of half man and half bird, stole the “Tablet of Destinies” from Enlil and hid them on a mountaintop. In Babylonian myth, Anzû is an Anunnaki deity associated with cosmogony. Anzu also appears in the story of “Inanna  and the Huluppu Tree”, which is recorded in the preamble to the Sumerian epic poem Gilgamesh, Enkidu, and the Netherworld. Anzu also appears in the ancient Sumerian poem Return of Lugalbanda or Lugalbanda and the Anzud Bird…although, Zu/Anzu also goes by the name Lugalbanda…”food for thought”. The shorter Old Babylonian version was found at Susa. Full version in Myths from Mesopotamia: Creation, The Flood, Gilgamesh, and Others by Stephanie Dalley, page 222 and at The Epic of Anzû, Old Babylonian version from Susa, Tablet II, lines 1-83, read by Claus Wilcke. The longer Late Assyrian version from Nineveh is most commonly called The Myth of Anzu. (Full version in Dalley, page 205). The rest is already known to you… Narrated and Created by A.Christie (m7) creator

Ishtar the Great Mother of the Anunnaki

Ishtar the Mother of the Anunnaki. A look into the true nature of the Great Mother Ishtar. She appears to have a parasite of sorts… Ishtar was undoubtedly a goddess of the fertility of the earth. She was the ‘Great Mother’ who fostered all vegetation and agriculture. She is frequently addressed as ‘Mother of the gods,’ the Anunnaki, and the name “Ishtar ” became a generic designation for “goddess.” But of course these were later honors. When her cult centred at Erech, it appears to have speedily blossomed out in many directions, and, as has been said, lesser cults probably eagerly identified themselves with that of the Great Earth-Mother, so that in time her worship became more than a Babylonian cult. Astrologically she was identified with the Planet Venus , but so numerous were the attributes surrounding her taken from other goddesses with which she had become identified that they threatened to overshadow her real character, which was that of the great and fertile mother. More especially did her identification with Nin-lil, the consort of Enlil, the storm-god, threaten to alter her real nature, as in this guise she was regarded as a goddess of W-battle. It is rare that a goddess of fertility or love achieves such a distinction. In some texts we find that, so far from being able to protect herself, Ishtar and her property are made the prey of the savage Anunnaki Enlil, the storm-god. Enlil “His word sent me forth,” she complains; watch the video… The poem, which in its existing form consists of 137 lines in cuneiform characters, appears to be incomplete. We are not told therein the purpose of the goddess in journeying to the ‘House of No-return,’ but we gather from various legends and from the concluding portion of the poem itself that she went there in search of her bridegroom Tammuz, the sun-god of Eridu. Ishtar is certainly one of the most important characters of this region.

Narrated and Created by A.Christie